Hope for the Cheerful: Because the hurting already know what to do
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Hope for the Cheerful: Because the hurting already know what to do

Isn’t it strange that there’s a huge, gaping hole in the outpouring of hope for the ones who most need it, yet who are least likely to seek it–the cheerful?

 

 

“That’s okay, I’m good”

The happy-go-lucky, got-a-click-in-my-step and a dollar in the bank crew is so overwhelmed with momentary goodness, they never suspect there’s a reason to even think about, much less invest in, long-term bliss.

 

 

 

The hurting, however, know exactly what to do, because they must. And if a hurting person isn’t looking for ways to pad their knees and plug their ears from excessive kneeling and screaming out to God, I’ll bet–as my grandma used to say, “they haven’t hurt bad enough for long enough.”

 

 

Ice Cream Goodness

Think of offering hope to the cheerful like giving the sunny day buyer of an ice cream cone a couple of extra napkins. They may be satisfied with the simple, paper funnel wrapped around the bottom of the cone  because they are so eager to get at the creamy yumminess. 

 

 

 

But you, the vendor, know that unless they gulp the entire thing in one fell swoop, they will need napkins, because the least little distraction or delay from licking themselves into a frenzy will cause that wonderful, icy treat to melt down their cone and down their hand into an unmanageable mess.

 

 

 

The succulent swirl becomes a sticky fly-trap they long to rinse off and be done with.

 

 

Give the Word

So next time you see someone caught up in the wiles of a triple-decker, offer a couple of napkins–not because you wish them harm, but because you wish them joy. Give them the Word–the Truth–the only lasting goodness that will have them licking their chops long after the cone is gone.

 

The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever.   Isaiah 40:8

 

Sherry Boykin

Sherry Boykin, the founder of Faith and Tales, is a storyteller and chronic believer in the power of faith narratives to change lives. She loves to use biblical and personal accounts to help women move beyond their obstacles, glean fresh perspectives on life, and to live differently as a result. Her experiences in urban and suburban ministries, Peruvian Amazon jungle missions, long-term singleness, marriage and family, and men's dorm-living shape her life and provide a colorful backdrop from which to share the Word of God. Sherry is the author of But-Kickers: Growing Your Faith Bigger Than Your But and she has been interviewed for articles in Time, The New York Times, and Better Homes and Gardens.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Sue Badeau

    Amen! I think I see a lot of my adult children in this description: “The happy-go-lucky, got-a-click-in-my-step and a dollar in the bank crew is so overwhelmed with momentary goodness, they never suspect there’s a reason to even think about, much less invest in, long-term bliss.”

    The ones who are not in a crisis, the ones who are not addicted to drugs, nursing the pain of a broken relationship or living day-to-day without a job. These are the ones who have a decent job, a comfortable home, good relationships and like to have a good time. Life is a constant ice-cream cone for them. They are actually the ones I worry most about. They are not investing in their long-term (read: eternal) well-being. I pray for them every day that something will shake them out of their “good-enough” life so that they will turn to God.

    Thanks for sharing this!

    1. Sherry Boykin

      Yes, Sue–I understand. Too bad it takes something difficult, disappointing, or devastating to get us to act like we’re not orphans.

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